Fall 2021 e-Bulletin

Fall 2021 e-Bulletin

SPOTLIGHT ON OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE ESTIMATES

Updates to our occupational exposure estimates, upcoming webinar

​We are pleased to announce that we have updated our suite of occupational exposure estimates for over 40 known or suspected carcinogens, including asbestos, solar radiation, and silica. These estimates, updated from 2006 to 2016, include the number of workers exposed to carcinogens by industry, occupation, province, sex, and exposure level (when available).

Our results show that there has been an increase in the number of workers exposed to some key carcinogens in Canada over time*. For example:

  • The number of workers exposed to asbestos increased from 152,000 to 235,000, up 55% from 2006 to 2016.
  • Approximately 7 million workers are exposed to solar radiation, which represents a 12% increase from 2006 to 2016.
  • The number of workers exposed to diesel engine exhaust increased by approximately 8%, for a total of 966,000 workers exposed.
  • Approximately 429,000 workers are exposed to crystalline silica, a 12% increase from 2006 to 2016.

*Note: Many of the changes observed in the 2016 estimates reflect changes in the Canadian labour force. For asbestos, however, the increase was primarily driven by the identification of additional occupations where exposure may occur that were not included in our 2006 estimate.

The new 2016 estimates can be viewed on the occupational exposures tab of select carcinogen profiles.

Our occupational exposure summaries have also been redesigned and updated with our new estimates. These documents summarize CAREX Canada data and resources by occupation (e.g. welders), industry (e.g. construction, mining), cancer site (e.g. lung carcinogens), and more. The summaries are available here.

Are you interested in learning more about our updated occupational exposure estimates and workplace cancer prevention? We are hosting a webinar on January 25, 2022 that will walk you through our results, share how they can be used to help inform cancer prevention activities, and discuss what’s next in occupational cancer prevention with three experts in the field: Drs. Mary Schubauer-Berigan, Calvin Ge, and Paul Demers. Register here.

Anne-Marie Nicol - Co-Principal Investigator

TEAM NEWS

Dr. Anne-Marie Nicol’s changing role

In early 2022, Dr. Anne-Marie Nicol will be moving on from her role as CAREX Canada’s co-Principal Investigator, and Dr. Cheryl Peters will be taking over as lead Principal Investigator. Please join us in thanking Dr. Nicol for her incredible work with CAREX Canada. Her contributions and expertise have been a valued asset to our team. We wish her all the best in her future endeavours.

A message from Dr. Nicol

Over the past 15 years, I have had the pleasure of meeting and working with a fantastic and talented group of people at CAREX Canada. I want to thank them, along with our many stakeholders and the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer for making CAREX Canada the unique and successful resource that it is today.

With best wishes,
Anne-Marie

UPDATING RESOURCES

Assessing carcinogen exposures in young and new workers

Young and new workers are often at greater risk of injury on the job, but little is known about their increased vulnerabilities to carcinogen exposures at work. Many unique characteristics of these populations may put them at higher risk of exposure, including limited workplace experience and inadequate safety training. We conducted a review to identify workplaces where young and new workers might be at higher risk of exposures, including those with a large number of young or new workers and a higher number of potential exposures. We found that young and new workers in the construction industry, young workers in farming and other outdoor jobs, and new workers in the accommodation and food services sector may be at greatest risk for exposure to carcinogens.

The key findings of this research can be found in the research briefs and summary here.

New carcinogen profiles for acrolein and 1-bromopropane

Profiles for acrolein and 1-bromopropane are now available. Acrolein is a chemical synthesized for use as a pesticide in Canada, and is also generated during natural processes (e.g. during forest fires) and through human-driven activities (e.g. during the combustion of organic materials including fuels, high temperature cooking, smoking). In 2020, acrolein was classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2A). The new acrolein profile is available here.

1-Bromopropane is used as a solvent in the spray adhesive industry to manufacture polyurethane foam cushions, as a vapour degreasing agent, and as a cleaning solvent for metals, plastics, optical, and electronic components. Workers are primarily exposed through inhalation and dermal contact, with aerosol applications leading to higher exposures. The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies 1-bromopropane as possibly carcinogenic to humans (Group 2B). The new 1-bromopropane profile is available here.

COMMUNICATIONS UPDATE

New pesticide webinar recording, overview video, and a podcast on radon

A recording of our webinar on occupational and environmental pesticide exposures is now available. This webinar discusses exposures to three commonly used pesticides in Canada – glyphosate, 2,4-D, and chlorothalonil – among agricultural workers and residents living near agricultural areas, and provides an overview of our new pesticide exposure estimates.

We’ve also updated our CAREX Canada overview video, which includes a tour of our website and a summary of the resources and tools that we offer. The videos are available here.

Our co-Principal Investigator Dr. Cheryl Peters recently spoke to the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) on their podcast to discuss workplace radon exposures and the impact the pandemic has had on radon exposures at work and at home. The podcast episode is available here.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Cancer and the environment project, safe handling of antineoplastic drugs, and radon in schools

Our team recently published several journal articles on CAREX-related research, including:

A full list of our publications is available here.

Please note that the CAREX Canada e-Bulletin is now a bi-annual digest. For more regular communications from us, please subscribe to Carcinogens in the News, a monthly digest of media articles, government reports, and academic literature related to the carcinogens we’ve classified as important for surveillance in Canada.

Subscribe to our newsletters

The CAREX Canada team offers two regular newsletters: the biannual e-Bulletin summarizing information on upcoming webinars, new publications, and updates to estimates and tools; and the monthly Carcinogens in the News, a digest of media articles, government reports, and academic literature related to the carcinogens we’ve classified as important for surveillance in Canada. Sign up for one or both of these newsletters below.

CAREX Canada

Faculty of Health Sciences

Simon Fraser University
Harbour Centre Campus
2602 - 515 West Hastings St
Vancouver, BC  V6B 5K3
CANADA

© 2022 CAREX Canada

Spring 2021 e-Bulletin

Spring 2021 e-Bulletin

SPOTLIGHT ON CAREX RESOURCES

CAREX Canada launches newly designed interactive maps by health region

We are pleased to announce the launch of our newly designed maps for environmental carcinogens. These interactive maps show predicted levels of known or suspected carcinogens in the air across Canada. Users can explore the data by health region for 22 substances, including benzene, radon, diesel engine exhaust, and particulate matter (PM2.5).

The new maps are available on the environmental exposures tab of select carcinogen profiles on our website.

Harmonizing occupational exposure limits in Canada and a recommendation for diesel engine exhaust

We recently published a commentary that explores the regulatory landscape of setting occupational exposure limits (OELs) in Canada and highlights the limitations that result in unequal and inadequate protection of workers from harmful exposures. We recommend that Canada overcome these current disparities by moving towards harmonized, evidence-based OELs. By adopting a centralized framework, Canada would ensure that limits are based on the most recent evidence and are feasible to implement in a Canadian context. The open-access commentary is available here.

This commentary features findings from our recent report, “Setting an Occupational Exposure Limit for Diesel Engine Exhaust in Canada: Challenges and Opportunities”, which summarizes the key barriers and facilitators to setting an occupational exposure limit (OEL) for diesel engine exhaust (DEE) in Canada. Current scientific evidence supports the need for a more protective OEL for DEE in Canada, however few jurisdictions have workplace limits (with the exception of the mining industry). Based on evidence of increased lung cancer risk at very low levels, we recommend that Canadian jurisdictions move towards an OEL based on elemental carbon (the best marker of exposure) of 20 µg/m3 for the mining industry and 5 µg/m3 for other workplaces to protect worker health. The report is available here.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Sun protection behaviours in Alberta workers, men and women at work in Canada, and occupational pesticide exposures

Our team recently published several journal articles on CAREX-related research, including:

A full list of our publications is available here.

CAREX NEWS

New grants awarded to study awareness of cancer causes and the impact of sex and gender on occupational disease

CAREX Canada researchers and collaborators, led by our co-Principal Investigator Dr. Cheryl Peters, were recently awarded two grants to expand our research:

  • The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Partnership Engage Grant will bring together experts at the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS), CAREX Canada, the University of Calgary, and the University of Regina to assess Canadians’ awareness of cancer risk factors and beliefs in myths about the causes of cancer. This work will involve a national online survey – stay tuned for more information.
  • The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Project Grant will support our research that examines the impact of sex and gender on the risk of three occupational diseases (cancer, asthma, and contact dermatitis) and addresses gaps in exposure assessment, which has inadequately considered differences in exposure by sex and gender.

UPCOMING EVENTS

CAREX webinar on pesticide exposures and the EPICOH occupational health symposium

On June 25th, 2021, we’re hosting a webinar on environmental and occupational pesticide exposure in Canada. This webinar will focus on exposure to three commonly used pesticides in Canada – glyphosate, 2,4-D, and chlorothalonil. It will explore pesticide use across the country, summarize the health outcomes associated with exposure to the three pesticides, and share CAREX Canada’s new results on the number of workers and community members who may be exposed to pesticides from agricultural use. Register for this webinar here.

The 28th International Symposium on Epidemiology in Occupational Health (EPICOH) is taking place virtually this October. EPICOH promotes communication and collaborations among epidemiologists, industrial hygienists, and other occupational health scientists from around the world, and covers a variety of topics including occupational exposures, disease prevention, methodology, and more. The theme of this year’s conference is “From the workplace to the population: Exposure and prevention.” Abstract submissions will be accepted until May 15th, and registration – which is free for all students – is now open.

COMMUNICATIONS UPDATES

Recent stories from our Carcinogens in the News digest

This month, we’re featuring two stories that appeared in our Carcinogens in the News digest:

You can subscribe to our monthly Carcinogens in the News digest here.

Please note that the CAREX Canada e-Bulletin is now a bi-annual digest. For more regular communications from us, please subscribe to Carcinogens in the News, a monthly digest of media articles, government reports, and academic literature related to the carcinogens we’ve classified as important for surveillance in Canada.

Subscribe to our newsletters

The CAREX Canada team offers two regular newsletters: the biannual e-Bulletin summarizing information on upcoming webinars, new publications, and updates to estimates and tools; and the monthly Carcinogens in the News, a digest of media articles, government reports, and academic literature related to the carcinogens we’ve classified as important for surveillance in Canada. Sign up for one or both of these newsletters below.

CAREX Canada

Faculty of Health Sciences

Simon Fraser University
Harbour Centre Campus
2602 - 515 West Hastings St
Vancouver, BC  V6B 5K3
CANADA

© 2022 CAREX Canada

Fall 2020 e-Bulletin

Fall 2020 e-Bulletin

SPOTLIGHT ON COVID-19

Webinar recording on workplace transmission of COVID-19

As part of our ongoing work to assess and reduce exposure inequities across jurisdictions and populations, our team has been studying the impact the COVID-19 pandemic is having on occupational health. At a recent webinar presented in partnership with the Industrial Accident Victims Group of Ontario (IAVGO), our co-Principal Investigator Dr. Cheryl Peters and collaborator Dr. Mieke Koehoorn shared the results of their research on those who may be more susceptible to COVID-19 transmission at work.

Based on an analysis of media reports on workplace exposures, the largest number of unique outbreaks occurred among industrial butchers and meat packing plant workers, nurses and nurse aides, material handlers, and cashiers. As well, one quarter of all media articles analyzed mentioned immigrant or temporary foreign workers as part of the reported COVID-19 outbreak.

The webinar recording is available here.

RESEARCH UPDATES

New data on sun exposure in outdoor workers

Despite the significant health and economic impacts of workplace exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR), occupational exposure measurements to quantify the hazard are limited in most Canadian provinces. To address this gap, our team assessed sun exposure in outdoor workers in Alberta, which has some of the highest ambient sun levels in the country.

The results of our study show that outdoor workers in Alberta may be at considerable risk of solar UVR exposure in the summer months. Almost half of the workers were exposed to levels that exceeded the international occupational exposure limit guideline, with some workers exposed to levels 13 times this guideline.

We also found that few jurisdictions worldwide have surveillance systems in place to control exposure and reduce the risk of non-melanoma skin cancers in this vulnerable worker population. Some key considerations for designing and implementing an occupational surveillance program are summarized in our results.

The full results from this research are available here.

PARTNER UPDATES

Raising awareness on radon exposure

November was Radon Action Month. This year, we’re highlighting some of the work our partners are doing to raise awareness about radon and support action to reduce exposure to this radioactive gas:

Learn more about exposure to radon on our radon resources page.

OCRC launches new Ontario Occupational Disease Statistics website

The Occupational Cancer Research Centre (OCRC) recently launched a new website on occupational disease in Ontario. The interactive website allows users to explore the risks of cancer and other diseases among workers in various industries and occupations. Data is currently available for the construction, healthcare, metal manufacturing, mining, and transportation sectors, with additional sectors and workplace exposures coming soon.

The website is available here.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

CAREX Canada’s knowledge translation approach, cancer risks in a First Nations community, and environmental pesticide exposures

Our team has recently published several journal articles on CAREX research, including:

A full list of our publications is available here.

COMMUNICATIONS UPDATES

Recent stories from our Carcinogens in the News digest

This month, we’re featuring three stories that appeared in our Carcinogens in the News digest:

  • Quebec is lowering the acceptable limits of asbestos permitted to be in the air in workplaces. The new regulation will bring the province in line with norms already in place in Canada and throughout North America.    
  • Researchers at the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) compared the costs and benefits of different prevention methods to reduce silica dust exposure for construction workers. They found that a combination of three methods – wet method, local exhaust ventilation, and personal protective equipment – can avert the highest number of lung cancer cases (107 cases per year). However, the most cost-beneficial approach is the wet method used in combination with local exhaust ventilation, which can avert 95 lung cancer cases per year. For more research and news from the IWH, subscribe to their monthly newsletter here.
  • The Canadian Cancer Society has released their Canadian Cancer Statistics report, which provides new, detailed estimates of lung cancer incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence in Canada. It also includes information on important and emerging issues related to lung cancer, such as risk factors, screening, treatment, and equity.

You can subscribe to our monthly Carcinogens in the News digest here.

Please note that the CAREX Canada e-Bulletin is now a bi-annual digest. For more regular communications from us, please subscribe to Carcinogens in the News, a monthly digest of media articles, government reports, and academic literature related to the carcinogens we’ve classified as important for surveillance in Canada.

Subscribe to our newsletters

The CAREX Canada team offers two regular newsletters: the biannual e-Bulletin summarizing information on upcoming webinars, new publications, and updates to estimates and tools; and the monthly Carcinogens in the News, a digest of media articles, government reports, and academic literature related to the carcinogens we’ve classified as important for surveillance in Canada. Sign up for one or both of these newsletters below.

CAREX Canada

Faculty of Health Sciences

Simon Fraser University
Harbour Centre Campus
2602 - 515 West Hastings St
Vancouver, BC  V6B 5K3
CANADA

© 2022 CAREX Canada

Spring 2020 e-Bulletin

Spring 2020 e-Bulletin

SPOTLIGHT ON NIGHT SHIFT WORK

New report on research challenges and publication on workplace estimates

The International Agency for Research on Cancer recently released their evaluation on the carcinogenicity of night shift work, classifying it as probably carcinogenic to humans due to limited evidence in humans for cancers of the breast, prostate, colon, and rectum. In response to ongoing uncertainties in research on night shift work, our team has produced a new report, “Carcinogenicity of night shift work: Data gaps and research challenges. Results show that the main challenges include:

  • Adequately assessing exposure to this unique circumstance (i.e. working at night)
  • Capturing the population at highest risk of cancer in research studies
  • Disentangling the complex and related mechanisms of action that lead to cancer

The report is available here.

Our estimates of workplace exposure to night shift work have been published in the Annals of Work Exposures and Health. Approximately 1.8 million Canadians were exposed to night shift work in 2011. Industries with the largest number of exposed workers were trade (396,000 exposed), healthcare/social assistance (318,000), and manufacturing (261,000 exposed). The publication is available here.

UPDATING RESOURCES

Reducing workplace exposure to antineoplastic agents

Our new resources on reducing workplace exposure to antineoplastic agents are now available. Our team examined the factors that affect safe handling of antineoplastic agents and produced several resources to support exposure reduction efforts, including:

  • A compendium of policy levers for safe handling in different healthcare settings
  • A comparison of policy levers for safe handling in Alberta, Manitoba, and British Columbia
  • A prevention framework to help organizations assess and audit their own safety procedures and plans

The resources are available here.

Workplace and environmental exposure estimates for three pesticides now available

We recently developed occupational and environmental exposure estimates for three pesticides commonly sold in Canada – chorothalonil, 2,4-D, and glyphosate.

Our occupational estimates show the number of workers exposed to each pesticide, as well as breakdowns by farm type and region. In Canadian agricultural workplaces, we estimate that:

  • Up to 14,000 workers are exposed to chlorothalonil
  • Up to 43,000 workers are exposed to 2,4-D
  • Up to 55,000 workers are exposed to glyphosate

Our environmental estimates show the number of people potentially exposed to each pesticide by region based on their residential proximity to agricultural areas, as well as national maps of agricultural pesticide usage. In Canadian communities, we estimate that:

  • Over 1.5 million people live in areas with higher potential for chlorothalonil exposure
  • Over 2 million people live in areas with higher potential for 2,4-D exposure
  • Over 2 million people live in areas with higher potential for glyphosate exposure

Our pesticide estimates and other resources are available here.

Ionizing Radiation

New ionizing radiation estimates and summaries for emerging issues

We recently updated our occupational exposure estimates for ionizing radiation and found that approximately 35,000-86,000 Canadians are exposed to ionizing radiation at work. These exposures are most prevalent in nurses, aircrew members, ward aids, and orderlies. The occupational exposure estimates are available here.

We also monitor substances of growing concern to Canadians, and have two new emerging issues summaries available on our website:

  • Workplace exposure to ultraviolet radiation from indoor farming lights used to promote plant growth
  • Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), a large group of synthetic chemicals used in a variety of consumer and industrial products including adhesives, cleaning products, cosmetics, and fire-fighting foams

The new emerging issues summaries are available here.

COMMUNICATIONS UPDATE

Webinar recordings on workplace exposure to sun and antineoplastic agents now available

Two new webinar recordings are now available online:

  • Sun exposure in outdoor workers – Measurement and monitoring discusses the risks of occupational sun exposure, shares results from an ultraviolet radiation exposure monitoring project of outdoor workers in Alberta, and outlines the barriers and facilitators that influence surveillance systems for outdoor workers.
  • Reducing occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs discusses the factors that influence the safe handling of antineoplastic drugs, shares an updated comparison of safe handling policy levers, and provides tools to support safer environments for workers handling antineoplastic drugs.

The webinar recordings are available here.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

New publication on the burden of workplace radon exposure

Newly published results from the Burden of Occupational Cancer in Canada Study show that 0.8% of lung cancers in Canada are caused by workplace exposure to radon, corresponding to approximately 188 lung cancer cases per year. The majority of indoor workers were exposed to relatively low levels of radon in the workplace. The publication is available here.

Please note that the CAREX Canada e-Bulletin is now a bi-annual digest. For more regular communications from us, please subscribe to Carcinogens in the News, a monthly digest of media articles, government reports, and academic literature related to the carcinogens we’ve classified as important for surveillance in Canada.

Subscribe to our newsletters

The CAREX Canada team offers two regular newsletters: the biannual e-Bulletin summarizing information on upcoming webinars, new publications, and updates to estimates and tools; and the monthly Carcinogens in the News, a digest of media articles, government reports, and academic literature related to the carcinogens we’ve classified as important for surveillance in Canada. Sign up for one or both of these newsletters below.

CAREX Canada

Faculty of Health Sciences

Simon Fraser University
Harbour Centre Campus
2602 - 515 West Hastings St
Vancouver, BC  V6B 5K3
CANADA

© 2022 CAREX Canada

Fall 2019 e-Bulletin

Fall 2019 e-Bulletin

SPOTLIGHT ON BURDEN OF OCCUPATIONAL CANCER

Occupational burden of cancer report and fact sheets now available

The Occupational Cancer Research Centre (OCRC) recently released their Burden of Occupational Cancer in Canada report, which presents estimates of the number of cancers caused by exposure to 44 known or suspected workplace carcinogens. Approximately 10,000 cancers per year in Canada are caused by exposures to carcinogens at work, including solar radiation, asbestos, diesel engine exhaust, and crystalline silica. The report also includes evidence-based policy recommendations for workplace cancer prevention, including strengthening occupational exposure limits and creating workplace exposure registries. To view the full report, visit the OCRC website.

CAREX Canada’s occupational exposure estimates were used to produce the burden estimates. We worked with OCRC to develop a series of two-page fact sheets summarizing the burden of cancer results for a number of substances, including asbestos, diesel engine exhaust, night shift work, solar radiation, second-hand smoke, and more. The burden fact sheets are available here.

ADDITIONS TO THE CAREX TEAM

Welcome Shelby

The CAREX team is pleased to welcome new staff member Shelby Fenton, Research Associate. Based at Alberta Health Services in Calgary, Shelby has expertise in environmental and occupational health, and has previously worked as a junior occupational hygienist and risk assessment specialist. She will be working on updating our occupational exposure estimates and supporting other projects related to workplace exposures. Please join us in welcoming Shelby to the CAREX team. Her full biography can be found on Our Team page.

UPDATING RESOURCES

New occupational exposure estimates for welding fumes, gasoline engine exhaust

Our new profile and occupational exposure estimates for welding fumes are now available. Our results show that approximately 333,000 Canadians are exposed to welding fumes at work, primarily in construction and manufacturing industries. Welding fumes are a complex mixture of fine particles and gases produced as a byproduct of welding activities and are classified as carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The profile is available here.

We also recently developed occupational exposure estimates for gasoline engine exhaust. Approximately 1.4 million Canadians are occupationally exposed to gasoline engine exhaust across many industries, including truck and transit transportation. The occupational exposure estimates are available here.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

New publication on occupational exposure to second-hand smoke

Our new estimates of workplace exposure to second-hand smoke have been published in the Canadian Journal of Public Health. Approximately 418,000 Canadians were exposed to second-hand smoke at work in 2016. This represents a 20% decrease in the number of workers exposed from 2006, largely due to efforts to reduce workplace second-hand smoke exposure and tobacco use across Canada. Workers in Saskatchewan and Newfoundland had the highest rates of exposure, while Ontario had the lowest. The publication is available here. The results are also available on our occupational exposure estimates webpage here.

COMMUNICATIONS UPDATE

Webinar recording on occupational lung cancer cases now online

Our recent webinar on legal cases related to occupational exposures and lung cancer is now available online. This webinar was presented in partnership with the Industrial Accident Victims’ Group of Ontario (IAVGO) Community Legal Clinic, the Occupational Health Clinics for Ontario Workers Inc. (OHCOW), and the Ontario Office of the Worker Adviser (ON-OWA). It covers legal clinic and advocate perspectives on lung cancer cases in the workers compensation system, relevant CAREX Canada resources on workplace exposures, and opportunities for training. The webinar recording is available here.

PARTNER UPDATE

Supporting awareness and research during Radon Action Month

November is Radon Action Month. This year, we continue to support radon awareness and research with our partners. We are part of the advisory team for Take Action on Radon, a national initiative to bring together radon stakeholders and raise awareness about radon across Canada. Their new campaign, Today 4 Tomorrow, encourages Canadians to test their homes for radon, highlights the positive actions of municipalities across Canada, and shares steps communities can take to help their residents protect themselves. Learn more about the initiative here.

Radon testing data is often collected by many organizations and can be difficult for researchers and public health professionals to access. With our support, the BC Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) is developing the BC Radon Data Repository (BCRDR), an integrated dataset of radon testing results from across the province to help make this data more accessible for research and prevention. To learn more about the initiative or to contribute radon testing data to the BCRDR, please contact Jeffry Trieu.

Please note that the CAREX Canada e-Bulletin is now a bi-annual digest. For more regular communications from us, please subscribe to Carcinogens in the News, a monthly digest of media articles, government reports, and academic literature related to the carcinogens we’ve classified as important for surveillance in Canada.

Subscribe to our newsletters

The CAREX Canada team offers two regular newsletters: the biannual e-Bulletin summarizing information on upcoming webinars, new publications, and updates to estimates and tools; and the monthly Carcinogens in the News, a digest of media articles, government reports, and academic literature related to the carcinogens we’ve classified as important for surveillance in Canada. Sign up for one or both of these newsletters below.

CAREX Canada

Faculty of Health Sciences

Simon Fraser University
Harbour Centre Campus
2602 - 515 West Hastings St
Vancouver, BC  V6B 5K3
CANADA

© 2022 CAREX Canada